Is it the next big thing?

Posts tagged ‘women’

How much are you spending on replacing employees that leave due to WLB?

In an economy where employment is high, attrition is also on the increase and competition for talent is fierce. At an average UK attrition rate of 15%, this poses a huge cost to organisations and with this knowledge, it’s more important than ever that companies measure, monitor and understand why their employees are leaving and work out what it will take to retain their top talent.

What are the benchmarks?

Leading research stats suggest that one of the top three reasons employees either leave their company or accept a role with a company is work-life balance (WLB). We’ve identified three separate pieces of research (LinkedIn, Onrec and Bamboo HR) which consistently indicate a massive 30% of employees that leave, do so due to work life balance.

How much does it cost?

It’s widely published that the true cost of replacing a staff member averages at just over £30,000 and varies by sector with accountancy/ legal sectors bearing the highest costs.

This figure includes direct costs such as advertising, recruitment/ placement fees (averaging at around £5,433), and incorporates the cost (wages) of a new employee that are spent before they reach full productivity, which is between 4 and 12 months depending on the role/ sector plus management time office set up etc.  However, it doesn’t include the indirect impact of disengaged employees which can happen when someone leaves and may lead to increased sickness/ absence costs.

This figure of £30,000, may seem high to employers if not all elements are counted as part of replacement costs, perhaps because they are considered an overhead or a necessary cost of running the business?. However, with new recruits taking an average of 27.6 days of HR director time to hire and get up to speed (Onrec), plus onboarding, training and simply paying a recruit before they are productive and the costs soon start to pile up.  Overall, this is a significant cost to businesses of all sizes;

  • If your company employs 10,000 staff and you have an attrition rate of 8.5%, this could translate into an annual cost of replacing staff that leave due to WLB of £7.6 million.
  • If your company employs 250 staff and you have an attrition rate of 10%, this could still translate into an annual cost of replacing staff that leave due to WLB of £180,000.

Use our calculator to see how much regrettable attrition due to WLB could be costing your business.

Questions

Could it be that viewing the full cost of recruitment as an uncontrollable overhead is in fact, costing businesses millions of pounds?

Could focussing on retaining top talent that may leave due to work life balance priorities add a quantifiable, direct cost saving to the business?

Why do your employees leave? do you know and track the cost impact on your business?

I hope you find our calculator useful and thought provoking. Please let us know your comments on these numbers and whether you think this is a priority that is receiving enough investment and attention.

 

Jobsharing In Chemistry: Lessons learned

Reflecting with our candidates over their experience returning to a career in Chemistry through a pioneering Jobshare has uncovered some interesting lessons, which I’d like to share with you in support of helping more women (and men) advance their careers in science through Jobsharing, whatever your specialism.

“Jobsharing has been the ideal solution for us both, it has enabled us to return to the responsibility and potential of our full-time careers without compromising time with our family”.  

Jane and Helen both used a Jobshare solution as a phased return to full-time employment, taking on the responsibility and potential of a full-time career without compromising family time, or needing their employer to scale down a role.

As Associate Medicinal Chemist for a Contract Research Company, their role entailed applying their expertise in Chemistry to develop new compounds.  This involves everything from researching effective routes, running chemical reactions, synthesising new compounds, and everything in between including ensuring the lab is tidy and there isn’t an empty fume hood!.  Working 2.5 days each, with a half day overlap on the Wednesday, they offered a 1FTE partnership to their employer for a 6 month contract.

At the end of their contract, they were kind enough to take time to reflect on their experience and share how they have benefitted and what they have learned.

What was your first day like?

We both went in together for the induction and then Jane came in on the Tuesday and was straight into the lab and I started the next day.”

Jane: “I wanted as much as I could for people to only have to explain once to us and actually that was a good thing as well because I’d learn once from someone and then again by teaching it to Helen and vice versa.

Helen: “For me, I wanted us to hit the ground running and for people to look at us favourably, so wanted to make sure we got it right first time with learning about the protocol and bits of kit.”

Has it been successful?

Yes it has been a success, on various levels. For us, it’s got us back in a gentler way, we wanted to fulfil their (employer’s) criteria and get back into it and both work part-time.”

“As well as the new compounds we have created, we have received positive feedback like “you’ve tried lots of different things in this area”, “you’ve achieved lots”, “you’ve made lots of compounds and answered lots of questions that needed answering”, which makes me feel like it’s been a positive experience all round.”

What were the benefits?

it is the perfect balance of career and family” – After seven years parenting, Helen could still spend time with her children around homework and clubs and Jane could spend time with her pre-schoolers and get used to new childcare arrangements.

Jobsharing makes me more focussed”. I find the pressure is on a Tuesday afternoon when I know Helen is coming in on Wednesday, I want to show her what I’ve done on Monday and Tuesday and show progress.”  Having a mid-week handover means that Jobsharers are inherently accountable to their Jobshare partner for progress they have achieved on their days, which further boosts productivity.

our employer got two brains on each project whilst only paying for one, because you don’t stop thinking about it on your days off”

We made around 25 new compounds in 6 months” – it’s always difficult to pin this as an indicator of productivity due to the unpredictable nature of research and the varying complexity of compounds, but it’s nevertheless a sign that good progress was made by the partnership.

What are the lessons learned?

Communication is key – “if one is doing the washing up all the time, there’s a certain fairness to making sure it’s an equal share (of all elements of the role), also a lot of the presentations have been with Jane and there’s a certain degree of when you start to realise that somethings happening in such a way saying “are you alright with this?, rather than letting something fester.”  Accepting the success of the partnership as a reflection of your own success is crucial and tight communication with each other is key to this.

Don’t duplicate – “we have ended up with two lab books and separate filing systems, which would mean that on our working days we were walking around with 2 lab books. Instead we could simply share a drawer and a lab book, with the rule that one of us writes up progress using even pages and the other always on odd”.

Inform stakeholders how the Jobshare works – “colleagues would treat us like we were part-time and be reluctant to ask us to do certain duties saying “are you okay to do this lab tidy because I know you’re only in 2.5 days?” – when actually one of us is in all week so we have just as much time as an FTE.”  Introducing the Jobshare to stakeholders at the outset is a fundamental step towards optimising the benefits.

Share targets – “Have common targets and see yourself as sharing the role. At the start we were set separate targets which meant that I put a reaction on on a Friday and by the time I got in the following Wednesday it had been going too long and had biodegraded.”  After about a month, it became quite different as they both focussed on the same compounds and so could ask each other to work up a reaction that one had started; it became a true Jobshare and a lot easier to work with.

Thank you to Jane and Helen for sharing their insights with us, we covered a lot more in our discussion too so please let me know if there’s anything else you’d like to know.

Sharing is Caring: Job sharing as a supportive way to return to work

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For parents looking for a flexible way to return to work, job sharing is an option worth considering. Sara Horsfall, Founder and Director of Ginibee, a job share network, describes how job shares provide extra benefits for job sharers beyond reduced working hours.
 
One of the (many) times in a parent’s life we find extremely challenging, is reconnecting with our inner professional after discovering our inner parent. In other words, returning to work.  
Thinking about returning to work can be a particularly lonely time, when we can feel a range of conflicting emotions including guilt (for not being with our child 24/7), paranoia (that none of our parenting skills are relevant /we have “forgotten” our professional skills /people will think we can’t do our job anymore) and gratitude (when we find a role). These feelings can make it a stressful time and one which is often insufficiently supported. So, what if there was a proven way to return to your careerwithout leaving behind new life priorities, that benefits both you and your employer?   
One of the overarching benefits of successful job sharing we often see at Ginibee, for returners, is the supportive nature of the job share partnership. Imagine returning to work with someone who is faced with similar challenges in terms of creating time for other life commitments, whilst sharing similar career experience and ambitionForming a partnership with another enables job sharers to share the responsibility and opportunity of a full-time role without the associated time commitment and in doing so improves confidence (since women often find it easier to recognise the strengths in others than in ourselves), as well as creating the mental and physical space to attend to their life. By being aware of and respecting each other’s motivations and strengths, job sharers live a very fulfilled life both in terms of their career and life outside of work. 
Supportive Benefits of Job Sharing  
So what does being in a supportive job share mean to us?
  • Reduces Stress 

Although progressive employers understand that mentoring support is a key requirement to retain and develop parents as they return to work, it can still be rare. The great thing about job sharing is that successful partnerships self-mentor as part of setting up and maintaining the jobshare. Ruth, who switched from part-time work to job sharing in order to progress to a more senior level as Director of Strategy, said “I feel less stressed as a job sharer, because there’s a proper release valve. In other roles you might vent to your partner or husband at the end of the day, but they’re not in it, so with my job share partner we can really vent to each other and share the challenges, which means it’s not all in your head, and I find that to be really valuable.” 

  • Increases Confidence 
Another job sharer, Polly, says “job sharing is really supportive, which means you can take braver decisions faster, because with the best will in the world, your boss, your mentor etc. isn’t going to be quite as interested and involved as your job share partner. In particular, on management decisions where you might be worried about being too subjective about a matter, when you have both picked up on it you can give clearer, stronger, more objective messages.” 
  • Improves Focus 
When you know your days off really are days off, you have more energy to fully apply yourself on your working days. Employers of job share partnerships report that the inherent accountability of job share partnerships means they are easier to manage as they have another to share ideas and challenges with. Polly says “Being accountable to your job share partner keeps you focused and honest”. 
We only need to look to organisations like the Civil Service, Barclays, Transport for London that have launched jobshare schemes for their employees to see that this is now receiving a higher profile as part of creating and retaining diverse workforces. 
If you would like to access or retain talent through Jobsharing, or if you would are the untapped talent looking for a like-minded Jobshare partner, you can find more information and support, including Ginibee’s jobshare platform at www.ginibee.com.
 
 
Posted by Katerina
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Accessing talent through Jobsharing: case study

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How does Ginibee make Jobsharing easy?

When we realised that uptake of Jobsharing was around 1% despite being the only career option that offers a win-win to both employer and employee in terms of productivity, opportunity and continuity, we wanted to know why.  Our research, carried out by CJBS MBA candidates combined the views of large employers with those of over 200 candidates looking for flexible work and revealed some interesting findings:

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22% of candidates hadn’t heard of Jobsharing

 

42% of candidates didn’t think their employer will support it

 

38% of employees would consider Jobsharing if their employer supported it

 

 

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80% of employers were concerned about how to recruit one half of a partnership

 

The main barriers to Jobsharing are finding a compatible partner and the perceived hassle (to employers) of setting it up

 

43% of candidates would actively search for a Jobshare role

 

This research led us to take action as we could see the potential for Jobsharing to solve problems for both employee and employers, if these barriers were removed.

We’re proud to announce that our Jobshare platform is now live and was launched on Sunday 24th January at The New World Of Work, an event we partnered with Mum Plus Business for at the CJBS Centre for Social Innovation.

The platform empowers candidates to self-select Jobshare partners with support from Ginibee to create an “interview ready” partnership.  It makes it easy for employers by taking away the hassle of setting it up and sustaining a Jobshare, so they can offer equal opportunity to Jobsharer partnerships without creating additional work.

If you’d like to know more about Jobsharing, either as an attraction or retention strategy,  please get in touch.  You can find out how it all works at www.ginibee.com

How To Use Jobsharing To Create Highly Effective Leaders

The following post is a guest blog I contributed to the Professional Academy in January 2015.  I thought it would be useful to share it.

Creating the right environment to develop effective leaders can be a challenge. Sara Horsfall from Jobshare specialists Ginibee shares her vision for using flexible working to fast-track leadership development.

We are experiencing a crisis in leadership development. The current system is not working, and many high performing employees who aren’t able to work long hours are being overlooked for leadership positions.

What if there was another option?

I specialise in creating successful Jobshare partnerships, and in my experience I have encountered many high performing, high profile partnerships, where leadership roles are shared. Many of the key attributes of good leaders are essential for effective Jobsharing.

What if there was a requirement for Jobsharing as part of leadership training for both full-time and part-time employees? I believe this would help to bridge the leadership gap and produce improved opportunities for leadership development, compatible with career flexibility.

Leadership crisis in management

The leadership crisis

A survey by Human Resources blog TLNT in October 2014 revealed 42% of executives say company growth plans are “slowed by lack of access to the right leadership”.

And there is considerable dissatisfaction with the state of leadership despite significant investment.

Clearly, something needs to change.

We know that women account for only 20.7% of board positions despite many having the necessary skills. What if there was a way to ensure more women were given opportunities to prove and use their leadership skills even if they weren’t able to work full-time? And this doesn’t just apply to women. What about people preparing for retirement, or caring for a relative?

What makes a good leader?So what makes a good leader?

The subject of leadership can be a tricky one that is interpreted in many different ways, which perhaps contributes to the level of dissatisfaction that exists.

A survey by TLNT suggested that communication skills and humility are the top two leadership traits.

So how do developing leaders learn and practice these skills? And how do organisations create the opportunity for both men and women to practice these skills at all levels and at all points in their career, whether they’re working part-time or full-time?

Is job-sharing for you?Could Jobsharing be the answer?

I’d like you to imagine an organisation where leadership development and flexible working are harmonious. Where ‘required Jobsharing’ is an essential part of practicing important leadership skills ‘on the job’.

Employees who work full-time can share more than one role. In other words, ‘required Jobsharing’ not only develops leaders who want to work full-time and can share more than one role, but it offers a career development opportunity to those who need to work part-time through Jobsharing a career role.

Using Jobsharing in this way increases the pool of candidates for potential leadership roles and encourages equality, diversity and flexibility throughout the company.

How to integrate Jobsharing into your leadership development programme?

  • Open up all full-time leadership roles to applications from Jobshare partnerships.
  • Empower and enable employees to find and create Jobshare partnerships.
  • Actively support shared objectives, identity and accountability as a way of demonstrating strong leadership skills

Jobsharing Top Tip #1: Know Yourself

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This is the first of a series of posts looking at the fundamental components required to create a successful Jobshare partnership.

To “Know yourself” might sound a bit cheesy, but it’s true, when creating a shared identity with another, it’s important to delve beyond our skills. Whilst compatible skills are important, they are not fundamental because we can have the same skills as another but be unable to create a shared identity together. In fact, our attitude is more fundamental than our skills, which I touched upon in my previous post “It’s All About Trust”.

So stripping everything back to basics, whilst behavioural profiles are great at modelling our actions in a particular environment, to Jobshare successfully you need to be mindful of what drives each others behaviour, starting with your own.

So, the first and most fundamental piece to understand when considering a Jobshare is self-awareness, take a step back and really reflect on your motivations. If you haven’t yet considered a flexible working option then it might be a useful exercise to simply reflect on how you currently spend your time to at least check that you’re happy it’s right for you by asking yourself:

“How do you spend your time?

What are the 5 things you spend most of your time on?

What are the reasons you spend your time this way?”

If you’re considering a Jobshare then you may have already answered these questions and decided that you need to make a change, so well done!. In this case, to make sure you are going in the right direction, be mindful of: Do you know what you want in your life? Why do you work? What makes you feel good at work?

Once you know this information about yourself you can articulate it to a potential partner and vice versa.   Not only will this help in ensuring a compatible match but further down the line knowing this information and importantly, being mindful of it, will help you to have a fulfilling career and also to manage your interpretation of each others behaviour in the context of what you know about your motivations.

So in a nutshell

To establish an effective partnership, you need to understand who is coming into that relationship and fundamentally, that means understanding yourself. Self-awareness is critical, if you don’t know your own motivations, you can’t conceive how you are different to others. Therefore achieving results by working with others is made more complicated.

In my next post I’ll be exploring the next natural step which is to be aware of difference. We are all different and guess what, it’s a GOOD thing. Tune in next time for more on this.

If you’d like to anonymously help to increase understanding of peoples perceptions of Jobsharing, please complete our short survey at http://www.bit.ly/ginibee_survey .  Finally, if you’d like to explore Jobsharing as a career option with a work life balance, you can register at http://www.ginibee.com .  Until next time.

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