Is it the next big thing?

It’s All About Trust

trust pic

Trust is at a two year low across UK organisations according to the CIPD Employee Outlook survey for Spring 2014.  What does this mean?

According to Stephen Covey, it means reduced speed and increased cost of business, which makes perfect sense to me.  Let’s see, in high trust organisations, employees are empowered to make decisions and so business moves forward quickly and efficiently.  In low trust organisations, endless sign off procedures to authorise even the most minor business decision mean something like due diligence for example, can take several months and cost businesses millions.  Is it just me or does it seem rather ironic that one of the main contributors to reducing trust (and therefore increasing cost) can be a redundancy programme?!  Perhaps we should take a leaf out of the Germans book and consider work sharing or even better, Jobsharing as a more effective way of increasing productivity and building trust whilst streamlining costs?.

Developing trust from an early stage is a key trait to master and live as part of a Jobshare lifestyle and indeed as an effective leader. The benefit of this is much wider of course, as once you become aware of how trust links to behaviour and intentions, you will be able to make better sense of other types of relationships personally and professionally. Last weekend whilst on a course, someone suggested to me that being amongst the last people to leave was a sign of commitment, this is a huge and typical assumption that “face time” equals commitment.  What wasn’t known was the motivations of others, what they wanted to get out of each day, what other priorities they had in their life, what they were leaving to do and so huge assumptions had been made based on an individuals interpretation of behaviour.  Perhaps this type of assumption is the kind of lack of understanding that has led to organisational issues like Presenteeism.

My interest in this is linked to my research into how partnerships can be effectively matched as part of a Jobshare arrangement, I’ve looked into different types of psychometric tests all of which review our behaviour in different circumstances.  However, since our behaviour is simply our execution of intentions, or motivations, perhaps when building trust across partnerships, we should begin by raising awareness and articulating our motivations.  By sharing our motivations, we can more effectively interpret the behaviours of others and make judgements based on our understanding of their motivations rather than our perception of their behaviour; a good habit to get into in any relationship.

So where can you start? Self awareness is key, ask yourself do you know what your work motivations and intentions are? Do you articulate them to others? The key to building trust is to behave with integrity, be consistent with your motivations, keep your promises to yourself and to others.  Even something as simple as when you receive an e-mail or a phone message do you respond straight away or within a specific time frame? Do you set expectations and meet them?.  Fostering trust is all about the detail, If you can’t keep a promise, then don’t make it, because it’s the day to day behaviours that we may consider irrelevant, that lead to success or failure where building trust in relationships is concerned.

In my next post I will be talking about the top tips for successful Jobsharing.  If you are interested in Job sharing as a way of continuing part-time with your career so you can have more time with your family, or with your studies or other interests, you can join the Jobshare Network at Ginibee today for free at www.ginibee.com

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Comments on: "It’s All About Trust" (2)

  1. Enjoyed your article. It’s a topic that I’m keen to push in the Australian media & advertising industry.

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  2. […] To “Know yourself” might sound a bit cheesy, but it’s true, when creating a shared identity with another, it’s important to delve beyond our skills. Whilst compatible skills are important, they are not fundamental because we can have the same skills as another but be unable to create a shared identity together. In fact, our attitude is more fundamental than our skills, which I touched upon in my previous post “It’s All About Trust”. […]

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